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Read science articles on the ice age, glaciation and climatology. Discover the connection between ice ages and global warming.
Updated: 59 min 41 sec ago

Early Mesoamericans affected by climate change

Tue, 01/27/2015 - 13:08
Scientists have reconstructed the past climate for the region around Cantona, a large fortified city in highland Mexico, and found the population drastically declined in the past, at least in part because of climate change.
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Winters in Siberian permafrost regions have warmed since millenia

Mon, 01/26/2015 - 11:47
For the first time, researchers have successfully decoded climate data from old permafrost ground ice and reconstructed the development of winter temperatures in Russia's Lena River Delta. Their conclusions: over the past 7,000 years, winter temperatures in the Siberian permafrost regions have gradually risen.
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3-D view of Greenland Ice Sheet opens window on ice history

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 13:09
Scientists using ice-penetrating radar have created 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new maps will aid future research to understand the impact of climate change on the ice sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet is the second largest mass of ice on Earth, containing enough water to raise ocean levels by about 20 feet.
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Climate affects development of human speech

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 09:25
A correlation between climate and the evolution of language has been uncovered by researchers. To find a relationship between the climate and the evolution of language, one needs to discover an association between the environment and vocal sounds that is consistent throughout the world and present in different languages. And that is precisely what a group of researchers has done.
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Arctic ice cap slides into the ocean

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 07:17
Satellite images have revealed that a remote Arctic ice cap has thinned by more than 50 metres since 2012 -- about one sixth of its original thickness -- and that it is now flowing 25 times faster. The findings show that over the last two decades, ice loss from the south-east region of Austfonna, located in the Svalbard archipelago, has increased significantly. In this time, ice flow has accelerated to speeds of several kilometres per year, and ice thinning has spread more than 50km inland -- to within 10km of the summit.
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Drillers help make new Antarctic discoveries

Wed, 01/21/2015 - 13:48
An expedition to Antarctica yields new information about how climate change affects Antarctic glaciers. The study has discovered a new ecosystem, researchers report, including a unique ecosystem of fish and invertebrates living in an estuary deep beneath the Antarctic ice.
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Two lakes beneath the ice in Greenland, gone within weeks

Wed, 01/21/2015 - 12:51
Researchers discovered craters left behind when two sub-glacial lakes in Greenland drained away -- an indication that the natural plumbing system beneath the ice sheet is overflowing with meltwater. One lake once held billions of gallons of water and emptied to form a mile-wide crater in just a few weeks. The other lake has filled and emptied twice in the last two years.
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Death of a dynamo: A hard drive from space

Wed, 01/21/2015 - 12:07
Hidden magnetic messages contained within ancient meteorites are providing a unique window into the processes that shaped our solar system, and may give a sneak preview of the fate of the Earth's core as it continues to freeze.
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Greenland Ice: The warmer it gets the faster it melts

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 14:12
Melting of glacial ice will probably raise sea level around the globe, but how fast this melting will happen is uncertain. In the case of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the more temperatures increase, the faster the ice will melt, according to computer model experiments by geoscientists.
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Climate change does not bode well for picky eaters

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 11:13
In a part of the world that is experiencing the most dramatic increase in temperature and climate change, two very similar species of animals are responding very differently. New research suggests that how these species have adapted to co-exist with one another might be to blame.
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Giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica's ice sheet

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 10:22
Extreme weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers were behind intense snowstorms recorded in 2009 and 2011 in East Antarctica. The resulting snow accumulation partly offset recent ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, report researchers.
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Melting glaciers have big carbon impact

Mon, 01/19/2015 - 11:45
As Earth warms, scientists have been focused on how glaciers melting will affect sea level rise. But, another lurking impact is the amount of carbon that will be released when glaciers melt. This is the first attempt to calculate how much carbon will be released.
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Heart arrhythmias detected in deep-diving marine mammals

Fri, 01/16/2015 - 07:55
A new study of dolphins and seals shows that despite their remarkable adaptations to aquatic life, exercising while holding their breath remains a physiological challenge for marine mammals. The study found a surprisingly high frequency of heart arrhythmias in bottlenose dolphins and Weddell seals during the deepest dives.
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Nearly half the systems crucial to stability of planet compromised

Thu, 01/15/2015 - 15:35
Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity. That is the view of an international team of 18 researchers who provide new evidence of significant changes in four of the nine systems which regulate the resilience of the Earth.
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Correcting estimates of sea level rise

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 13:05
The acceleration in global sea level from the 20th century to the last two decades has been significantly larger than scientists previously thought, according to a new study. Previous estimates of global sea-level rise from 1900-1990 had been over-estimated by as much as 30 percent, researchers suggest.
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Greenland meltwater contributes to rising sea levels

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 10:16
As the largest single chunk of melting snow and ice in the world, the massive ice sheet that covers about 80 percent of Greenland is recognized as the biggest potential contributor to rising sea levels due to glacial meltwater.
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New technology purifies waste water by freezing it first: Possible applications in mineral extraction industry

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 08:31
Freezing technology can be utilized in waste water treatment, researchers in Finland have shown. When waste water freezes, it can be purified through the formation of a cleaner layer of ice. The clean layer of ice can be removed from the rest of the waste water, and the remaining waste water is more concentrated. The new energy-efficient method of purification is based on the natural freezing process of water: energy is required only for breaking the ice and transporting it from the waste water pool.
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On a tropical island, fossils reveal past -- and possible future -- of polar ice

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 15:24
The balmy islands of Seychelles couldn't feel farther from Antarctica, but their fossil corals could reveal much about the fate of polar ice sheets. About 125,000 years ago, the average global temperature was only slightly warmer, but sea levels rose high enough to submerge the locations of many of today's coastal cities. Understanding what caused seas to rise then could shed light on how to protect those cities today.
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Why is Greenland covered in ice? Processes in deep Earth interior created conditions for glaciation

Mon, 01/05/2015 - 10:25
The ice on Greenland could only form due to processes in the deep Earth interior. Scientists now explain why the conditions for the glaciation of Greenland developed only so recently on a geological time scale.
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Underwater drones map ice algae in Antarctica

Mon, 01/05/2015 - 09:14
New robot technology leads Antarctic exploration into a new epoch. It is now possible to study the underside of sea ice across large distances and explore a world previously restricted to specially trained divers only.
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