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Read science articles on the ice age, glaciation and climatology. Discover the connection between ice ages and global warming.
Updated: 7 min 31 sec ago

Platinum is key in ancient volcanic related climate change

Tue, 07/31/2018 - 08:20
Scientists look to platinum for clues to stay ahead of future high magnitude volcanic related climate change.

Ever-increasing CO2 levels could take us back to the tropical climate of Paleogene period

Mon, 07/30/2018 - 11:03
A new study has warned that unless we mitigate current levels of carbon dioxide emissions, Western Europe and New Zealand could revert to the hot tropical climate of the early Paleogene period -- 56-48 million years ago.

Carbon 'leak' may have warmed the planet for 11,000 years, encouraging human civilization

Mon, 07/30/2018 - 11:03
The oceans lock away atmospheric carbon dioxide, but a 'leak' in the Southern Ocean brings the greenhouse gas back into the atmosphere. An international research team looked at minute nitrogen concentrations embedded in diatoms, forams and corals to identify an increase in Southern Ocean upwelling during the past 11,000 years, which could explain the otherwise mysterious warmth of the Holocene that allowed human populations to flourish.

Deglacial changes in western Atlantic Ocean circulation

Sat, 07/28/2018 - 07:41
A new study carried out by an international team of researchers, using the chemistry of ocean sediments has highlighted a widespread picture of Atlantic circulation changes associated with rapid climate change in the past.

Glaciers in East Antarctica also 'imperiled' by climate change

Thu, 07/26/2018 - 15:10
Scientists have found evidence of significant mass loss in East Antarctica's Totten and Moscow University glaciers, which, if they fully collapsed, could add 5 meters (16.4 feet) to the global sea level.

How the Little Ice Age affected South American climate

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 16:43
For the first time, scientists reconstruct the rainfall distribution in Brazil during the climate changes that marked the Middle Ages using isotopic records from caves.

Microclimates may provide wildlife with respite from warming temperatures

Mon, 07/23/2018 - 13:28
Researchers suggest that locally variable habitats such as hummocky hillsides or shaded valleys could help a range of native species survive this modern warming episode -- in much the same way as species such as red deer and squirrel survived the Ice Age by seeking refuge in pockets of warmer conditions sheltered from the extreme cold.

Slowdown of North Atlantic circulation rocked the climate of ancient northern Europe

Mon, 07/23/2018 - 13:27
Major abrupt shifts occurred in the climate of ancient northern Europe, according to a new study. The research reports that sudden cold spells, lasting hundreds of years, took place in the middle of the warm Eemian climate period, about 120,000 years ago.

From cradle to grave: Factors that shaped evolution

Thu, 07/19/2018 - 13:20
This study brings us closer to knowing the complex interactions between topography and climate change, and how these factors influence the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of species in natural ecosystems.

Expected sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Thu, 07/19/2018 - 07:54
Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-ton iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimeters to sea-level rise. The break-up of the smaller George VI Ice Shelf would have a much larger impact.

Atlantic circulation is not collapsing -- but as it shifts gears, warming will reaccelerate

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 12:11
Data suggest that the recent, rapid slowdown of the Atlantic Ocean circulation is not a sign of imminent collapse, but a shift back toward a more sluggish phase. The slowdown implies that global air temperatures will increase more quickly in the coming decades.

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Wed, 07/18/2018 - 11:24
Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30% of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region.

Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

Mon, 07/16/2018 - 12:07
A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time -- and the news isn't good.

Changes in Hudson River may offer insight into how glaciers grew

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 12:51
Researchers say they may be able to estimate how glaciers moved by examining how the weight of the ice sheet altered topography and led to changes in the course of the river.

5,300-year-old Iceman's last meal reveals remarkably high-fat diet

Thu, 07/12/2018 - 10:46
In 1991, German tourists discovered a human body that was later determined to be the oldest naturally preserved ice mummy, known as Otzi or the Iceman. Now, researchers who have conducted the first in-depth analysis of the Iceman's stomach contents offer a rare glimpse of our ancestor's ancient dietary habits. Among other things, their findings show that the Iceman's last meal was heavy on the fat.

How ocean warmth triggers glacial melting far away

Thu, 07/12/2018 - 10:44
The melting of glaciers on one side of the globe can trigger disintegration of glaciers on the other side of the globe, as has been presented by scientists, who investigated marine microalgae preserved in glacial deposits and subsequently used their findings to perform climate simulations.

Mapping species range shifts under recent climatic changes

Thu, 07/12/2018 - 09:05
The inclusion of taxon-specific sensitivity to a shifting climate helps us understand species distributional responses to changes in climate.

Strengthening west winds close to Antarctica previously led to massive outgassing of carbon

Tue, 07/10/2018 - 09:16
A new explanation for the Heinrich 1 event, where temperatures over Antarctica rose 5C in less than a century, suggests strengthening westerlies around the Antarctic led to a substantial increase in atmospheric carbon. Today, human-caused climate change is causing these same westerly winds to contract towards Antarctica and strengthen, suggesting an unexpected spike in carbon dioxide could occur again.

Scientists discover the world's oldest colors

Mon, 07/09/2018 - 14:27
Scientists have discovered the oldest colors in the geological record, 1.1-billion-year-old bright pink pigments extracted from rocks deep beneath the Sahara desert in Africa.

Fingerprint of ancient abrupt climate change found in Arctic

Mon, 07/09/2018 - 10:11
A research team found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago.

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